Tuesday, November 2, 2010

Locally Harvested

Yesterday, I dropped off some work to be included in my first, official, fine art show. I've been slow to adopt the title "Artist" and have come a long way from making greeting cards to what I do now. This show marks my foray into gallery shows, and I'm pretty excited about it.

The Show: Locally Harvested "small art - big beauty". Held within the Capstone Gallery at 4325 Nicollet Ave S. in Minneapolis, November 12 - December 28. Opening Party will be November 19, from 6 - 9 p.m.

The Works:

"Reincarnations No.1" & "Reincarnations No.2"


These pieces represent an idea I've had rumbling around in my head and in my sketchbook for at least a year. I wanted to play with the silhouette trend that's been hot lately, and yet do something new and maybe meaningful with it. For this work, I've tried to capture the sense that we go through a series of different selves as we age, and that somewhere inside us, there are traces of ourselves as younger and younger "reincarnations."

These are some of the first pieces I've designed digitally for the Silhouette cutter. The newer software application is so much easier to use and has opened up a new world of cutting possibilities for me. So far, I'm quite pleased with the results.


"Flow"

This is another idea I've had for a long time: to create a topography-type piece in sections for a puzzle-like look. The result turned out better than I expected. I am digging the "friction" caused by seeing the flow of the water subject interrupted by the separation. Perhaps it's a comment about how we've disrupted the land around us. Or perhaps it's just neat.


"Elevated"

This piece is similar to "Flow" in that the subject has been sliced apart, but here, I've mounted them on a single piece of cardstock, and then elevated two of the pieces for more depth. I'm playing with the idea of topography, the height of the land, and the disruption of the status quo.


"Harvest"

Cut from 14 layers of brown and cream cardstock, this work has both the mountain and the quarry from which it was "mined" as equal halves of the same material.


"Clary Lake"

My last piece is an homage to Mr. Charles Clary, a contemporary paper artist to whom I've been nicely compared by some. I tried to mimic Clary's technique of layering with space in between the layers, while still maintaining my flair for topography, land and water.


This was my first experiment with this and I have to admit that my respect for the precision and complexity of Clary's work rose immensely throughout this process.


While working on these delayed my production of some custom requests and general shop stocking, the show is exactly the motivation I needed to work out some of these ideas, and feel a little more worthy of the title, "artist."

I'd love to hear what you think of these. And I'd really love to see you at the show!

12 comments:

Kendra Zvonik said...

I am blown away, Marnie! This is a great first show--all super solid ideas and perfectly executed!!

The introduction of actual elevation excites me with all the future sculptural possibilities. I can imagine this getting real big--public art like Noguchi. "Harvest" feels especially like a design for a public space. I can imagine climbing the terraces, like a Mayan temple. In fact, it reminds me of my travels to Guatemala where they actually terrace the hills and mountains this way.

The more you explore ideas regarding land and water, the more concepts appear to be emerging. This direction is definitely inspiring to you and that passion is clearly demonstrated in this work.

Exploring the concepts of division and reincarnation both reveal a strong point of view in a personal sense and, simultaneously, show your capabilities as Artist, as well as Designer. Dividing the land into a puzzle-like structure has strong potential for commentary as you suggested and I am eager to see what's next and learn more about your ideas!

Seeing the new Reincarnation series on the day my husband has turned 40, makes me empathize with him; all the different selves he has been during his lifetime. I think this idea is very compassionate and beautifully poetic. And the cutter has done some great work for you-yay!

Have a great show, Marnie! I am so proud of this new work you have done. Excellent! Keep going!!
xoxoxo Kendra

Angela said...

These are beautiful! I especially love the Reincarnation duo. I've been following your Etsy shop and blog for a while now, and I absolutely love your work! I wish I could see your show in person!
--Angela (angelawehrle on etsy)

abcgirl said...

wowie wowie wow. marnie you continue to amaze me. i LOVE the concept of your "reincarnation" pieces especially. I "got" what you were trying to say (we are always all of the ages we have ever been) before i even read what you wrote. At first glance, I'd thought it was concentric family portrait silhouettes, but I like this idea, and the thought behind it, much better. Oh they're just fantastic! And how did you get the space between layers in the McClary-esque pieces? I also really like the topo on four pages on two different planes--just brilliant.

p.s. my captcha word is a really fun one, "boomadoo"!

Ann Martin said...

All of the new pieces are so impressive, Marnie! I'm really glad to see you are making time to stretch yourself like this, not an easy task especially when there are other things nudging you to say they want attention too. Best of luck with the show and I'm sure it's just the first of many!

Sonya said...

Love your work. I had a duh moment when you mentioned the die cutter. I have had my Cricut only a short while and now can see bigger possibilities with it.

The reincarnation pieces are stunning and moving. I will be back to see more of your art!!!

hedgehogandrabbit.com said...

I tend to read your blog and not comment. I'm sorry for that. I value you as a true artist. This post just cements it. I really enjoy reading your posts and seeing what you're up to.

The "Flow" project turned out amazing. The interruption adds such visual interest to an already eye catching piece. I really can't wait to see more of this type of work.

"Harvest" was interesting to see because, as a fan, I always wonder what happens to the cut our pieces.

I really like them all, but those two styles stood out to me the most.

I actually sighed in relief at the mention of the silhouette. After the wonderful post about your hands, I wondered if you ever took a break. :)

M. B. Karger said...

Wow! You are all amazing! Thank you so much for the superb feedback. Not only is it kind and encouraging, but you have all touched on astute and thoughtful points that I cannot help but treasure and fuel my further endeavors. Thank you.

Inna (Crafts, Kids, Quilling) said...

Marnie,
I'd like to thank you for commenting on my blog and the inspiration you give! You are fantastic!
Inna

patricia said...

Marnie - First off I realize that this is coming waaayyy late—but I decided to ward off the embarrassment of not visiting more frequently—to say that I love this work that you're doing. A-mazing! My favorites=Harvest looks wonderful and Clary Lake looks completely drool worthy. Great job!

I've been wanting to work in layers too and you know what keeps stopping me? The fact that it will look like yours! Not that, that's bad at all—just that I don't want you to think I'm headed in your direction.

I need to go back to my beloved trees and layered cutouts of the beginning. I miss all that.

andrea said...

Clary Lake and Harvest are my favourites from this list =) The mix of hues is nice, too!

Anything topographic is drool worthy, but you make these look out of this world!!

tweal said...

I LOVE the silhouette pieces, they are genius!

Yeti said...

I've come across your blog by accident and, echoing what everyone else is saying, I would like to say I find your work simply beautiful.

 

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